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Weed Control – Herbicide

Weed Control – Herbicide

Weed control is the botanical component of pest control, which attempts to stop weeds, especially noxious or injurious weeds, from competing with domesticated plants and livestock. Weed control is important in agriculture. Many strategies have been developed in order to contain these plants. Methods include hand cultivation with hoes, powered cultivation with cultivators, smothering with mulch, lethal wilting with high heat, burning, and chemical attack with herbicides (weed killers).

Weeds compete with productive crops or pasture, ultimately converting productive land into unusable scrub. Weeds can be poisonous, distasteful, produce burrs, thorns or otherwise interfere with the use and management of desirable plants by contaminating harvests or interfering with livestock.

Weeds compete with crops for space, nutrients, water and light. Smaller, slower growing seedlings are more susceptible than those that are larger and more vigorous. Onions are one of the most vulnerable, because they are slow to germinate and produce slender, upright stems. By contrast broad beans produce large seedlings and suffer far fewer effects other than during periods of water shortage at the crucial time when the pods are filling out. Transplanted crops raised in sterile soil or potting compost gain a head start over germinating weeds.

A herbicide is a pesticide used to kill unwanted plants.

Selective herbicides kill certain targets while leaving the desired crop relatively unharmed.

Some of these act by interfering with the growth of the weed and are often based on plant hormones.

Herbicides used to clear waste ground are nonselective and kill all plant material with which they come into contact.

Some plants produce natural herbicides, such as the genus Juglans (walnuts).

Herbicides are widely used in agriculture and in landscape turf management.

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